Skip to main content
Skip to search

Courses

Exploration of the scientific principles governing natural systems and their contribution to understanding the emergence and biological evolution of humans, the role of environment in shaping human behavioral and cultural variation, and the consequences of human activity on local, regional, and…

This course focuses on learning the art and science of asking and answering questions about the human condition, within and between cultures. Through critical assessment and reasoning, we will learn to evaluate contemporary social science findings that are relevant to our daily lives.

The theory of evolution by natural selection through the natural history of humankind and of our closest relatives, the primates. Concepts of macro and microevolution, adaptation, cell and genetics, paleontology, human and primate origins, brain and language evolution, bioarchaeology, and…

Exploration of the scientific principles governing natural systems and their contribution to understanding the emergence and biological evolution of humans, the role of environment in shaping human behavioral and cultural variation, and the consequences of human activity on local, regional, and…

The exploration of many facets of food, emphasizing culture, history, environment, and power. We begin with a foundation of human biology and nutrition, and then move on to the many complex economic, political, and cultural processes that relate to food. We end by exploring food movements and…

Provides the basic foundations for conducting ethnographic fieldwork. Students will explore the unique strengths and utility of an ethnographic approach; learn how to conduct ethnographic techniques through hands-on, experiential learning activities; and apply these skills to a research project…

A critical examination and deconstruction of cultural stereotypes of the people vilified as “Gypsies” across Europe. A discussion of the social and economic marginalization of Roma in Europe to a “thick” ethnographic understanding of their history and culture, (e.g., purity beliefs, the…

The origins, causes, and consequences of warfare in human societies from the Paleolithic to the twenty-first century. Ethnographic, ethnohistoric, and archaeological data will be employed to evaluate the relationship between conflict and cultural change.

Basic concepts and principles of archaeology. Topics covered include history of archaeology, site formation processes, survey and excavation techniques, artifact typology and analysis, chronology, activity analysis, and general archaeological theory.

Relationships between humans and material things, with a strong emphasis on the material culture of Georgia from 10,000 BC until about AD 1900.

In this course “roots” and “rooting” are summoned as metaphors for re-territorialization and cultural revitalization among indigenous peoples, refugees, and immigrants whose senses of place may be undermined in a globalizing world. This course explores the scholarship on sensory memory and…

Multicultural diversity of beliefs and practices about health and illness of ethnic groups in the United States as it impacts on health care. Specific consideration of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans.

This course empowers students by teaching them how to turn their degree in anthropology into a career. Themes explored include professional qualifications, standards, ethics, job searches, CV and resume building, and communication skills. Academic and applied pathways are explored. Students will…

Through readings, discussions, and research projects this course will try to confront what D.W. Meinig's "central problem," "Any landscape is comprised not only of what lies before our eyes but what lies inside our heads."

Provides a broad overview of the history of cultural anthropology, from its beginnings in the Enlightenment to the present. We combine two approaches in this course: (1) an intellectual history approach, and (2) an approach that examines particular ethnographic accounts as exemplars of various…

Anthropology is the study of human diversity. Economics is the study of how people make decisions about resources. Economic anthropology examines the diversity of peoples' preferences, choices, behaviors, habits, activities, customs, and institutions relating to resources.

This introductory survey-level course in the field of modern underwater archaeology includes a study of prehistoric and early “historic” archaeological sites in Europe and North America. It will focus on ancient and indigenous watercraft as well as inundated habitation/specialized sites. This is…

Animal remains recovered from archaeological sites, studied in light of zoological and archaeological methods and theories and interpreted in terms of human and animal behavior.

Examination of ethnic and cultural diversity, and issues of gender, race, class, and culture within Mexican society. Consideration will also be given to the historical, political, economic, and social experiences of Mexican ethnic and cultural groups with special attention to their diversity and…

Supervised work experience with a natural history collection. Students will learn techniques and other procedures for curating materials in a collection of their choice under the direction of collection personnel.

Ethnobotanical research, with focus on knowledge and utilization of the plant world in traditional societies. Comparisons of societies in tropical forest ecosystems and evaluation of issues relating to intellectual property rights and traditional peoples' knowledge of plant species with…

Human osteology is the study of our bones. Osteology is relevant to disciplines that depend on detailed knowledge of the human body, e.g., forensic anthropology and paleoanthropology. Students will learn to identify and describe bones and use a comparative approach to understand their function…

This course explores archaeological approaches to modeling regional social processes with the goal providing students the theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches to understanding anthropological processes at the regional scale. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to…

This course focuses on urbanism in the past and present through a comparative lens. Particular attention will be given to the question of what can we learn from the development of ancient cities to better understand modern urban settings. Specific themes related to cities and urbanism will be…

This course explores archaeological approaches to modeling regional social processes with the goal providing students the theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches to understanding anthropological processes at the regional scale. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to…

This course focuses on urbanism in the past and present through a comparative lens. Particular attention will be given to the question of what can we learn from the development of ancient cities to better understand modern urban settings. Specific themes related to cities and urbanism will be…

Support Anthropology at UGA

Your support helps bring in speakers of note, provides student research funding, assists in student fieldwork and conference travel, and creates new resources to further enrich each learner's experience. Learn more about how you can support the Department of Anthropology.

Every dollar given has a direct impact upon our students and faculty.