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Courses

Exploration of the scientific principles governing natural systems and their contribution to understanding the emergence and biological evolution of humans, the role of environment in shaping human behavioral and cultural variation, and the consequences of human activity on local, regional, and…

Students are introduced to the most famous archaeological sites in the world, with themes centered around the following: evidence of early humans, first cities, death and burial, art and architecture, ritual and religion, warfare, sacrifice, conflict, and great inventions.

The theory of evolution by natural selection through the natural history of humankind and of our closest relatives, the primates. Concepts of macro and microevolution, adaptation, cell and genetics, paleontology, human and primate origins, brain and language evolution, bioarchaeology, and…

Exploration of the scientific principles governing natural systems and their contribution to understanding the emergence and biological evolution of humans, the role of environment in shaping human behavioral and cultural variation, and the consequences of human activity on local, regional, and…

Examination of the efforts of anthropologists to understand the contemporary world by providing a broad overview of approaches to the study of cultures of consumption.

Students will develop knowledge about the history of curation in North America and basic collection management practices, including the maintenance and preservation of artifacts and associated documentation. Policies, responsibilities, and curatorial best practices associated with management of…

Exploration of Old World prehistory from the Paleolithic until the Iron Age. Students will learn about developments that occurred throughout Europe, including hominin relations, agriculture and sedentism, and emerging urbanism. Developments in theories and methods in regard to Old World…

What is the “natural” human diet? What are the evolutionary, behavioral, and sociocultural factors influence contemporary diets? This course will introduce you to the field of nutritional anthropology, examine dietary variation throughout our species history, and explore role of evolution,…

This course explores the challenges of conservation on a damaged planet from an interdisciplinary range of perspectives. It focuses on the social and ecological dimensions of conservation across multiple scales and contexts.

Provides a solid academic basis for the practice of cultural resource management (CRM) in North America and in a broader global context. The course will cover CRM from a conceptual standpoint; how current legislation affects CRM; and will integrate theoretical, practical, and ethical aspects of…

Supervised work experience with a natural history collection. Students will learn techniques and other procedures for curating materials in a collection of their choice under the direction of collection personnel.

Students will maintain regular, weekly work schedules totaling 7 hours per…

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains in archaeological contexts. The skeleton is a dynamic structure that responds to stressors in the natural and built environments, offering insights on health, human-environment interactions, and social processes in the past. This course covers basics…

Two indigenous urban societies of the Americas, from farming village beginnings to the Spanish conquest, and their lasting impact on modern middle American culture. Topics include ecology, economy, political organization, urbanism, militarism, beliefs, art, architecture, and literature.

The methods used by anthropologists to reconstruct the history of preliterate societies from archaeological evidence, documentary evidence, and oral traditions. The ethnohistory of southeastern United States.

Through hands-on experience, students will be trained in different methods and techniques for conducting all phases of archaeological field and laboratory work, including surface survey, remote sensing, excavation, data and material recovery, recording, processing, and analysis. Students also…

Archaeological geology examines the use of earth science methods and theories in the study of archaeological sites and their contents. The four major areas covered include: (1) the archaeological site and geology; (2) age determination techniques; (3) exploration techniques; (4) artifact…

Archaeological geology examines the use of earth science methods and theories in the study of archaeological sites and their contents. The four major areas covered include: (1) the archaeological site and geology; (2) age determination techniques; (3) exploration techniques; (4) artifact…

This course explores the challenges of conservation on a damaged planet from an interdisciplinary range of perspectives. It focuses on the social and ecological dimensions of conservation across multiple scales and contexts.

Provides a solid academic basis for the practice of cultural resource management (CRM) in North America and in a broader global context. The course will cover CRM from a conceptual standpoint; how current legislation affects CRM; and will integrate theoretical, practical, and ethical aspects of…

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains in archaeological contexts. The skeleton is a dynamic structure that responds to stressors in the natural and built environments, offering insights on health, human-environment interactions, and social processes in the past. This course covers basics…

Two indigenous urban societies of the Americas, from farming village beginnings to the Spanish conquest, and their lasting impact on modern middle American culture. Topics include ecology, economy, political organization, urbanism, militarism, beliefs, art, architecture, and literature.

The methods used by anthropologists to reconstruct the history of preliterate societies from archaeological evidence, documentary evidence, and oral traditions. The ethnohistory of southeastern United States.

Research methods and techniques used in sociocultural anthropology, with emphasis on ethnographic field research, including observation, participant observation, interviewing, questionnaires, testing, and mapping. Methods of data organization, storage, retrieval, and preliminary analyses.

Through hands-on experience, students will be trained in different methods and techniques for conducting all phases of archaeological field and laboratory work, including surface survey, remote sensing, excavation, data and material recovery, recording, processing, and analysis. Students also…

This seminar will briefly explore the evolution of the use of geophysical methods for archaeology before moving to a consideration their use today. The most commonly used methods – electrical resistivity, conductivity, magnetometry and ground radar – will be examined in some detail. If nothing…

Theoretical population ecology applied to human populations. Biocultural aspects and multiplicity of causality in discussion/assessment of topics such as: human demography and population regulation; disease ecology and epidemiology in human populations; interrelationships of human nutrition,…

Evolutionary perspectives on the cultural and biocultural mediation of human-environment relations from the Plio-Pleistocene to the recent past, analyzed in terms of human ecosystem structures and functions, including cybernetics and flows of energy/matter and information; persistence and change…

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