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New Article, "Forests, Fields, and Pastures: Unequal Access to Brazil Nuts and Livelihood Strategies in an Extractive Reserve, Brazilian Amazon," from Ph.D. student Bruno Ubiali and Dr. Miguel Alexiades

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Congratulations to Bruno Ubiali, a Ph.D. student in Integrative Conservation and Anthropology, who has recently published the article “Forests, Fields, and Pastures: Unequal Access to Brazil Nuts and Livelihood Strategies in an Extractive Reserve, Brazilian Amazon.” The article is based on his thesis and co-authored by his Masters’ advisor, Dr. Miguel Alexiades. The study was conducted with forest extractivist rubber tappers (seringueiros) at the Cazumbá-Iracema Extractive Reserve, in the state of Acre, Brazilian Amazon. 

The study speaks to a body of literature that analyzes traditional populations’ livelihoods in the Amazon and will allow readers to further understand the complexities between differential access to forest resources and the livelihood strategies designed by smallholders, allowing to use the potentialities as well as the limitations of forest extractivism for the design of policies that aim for resilience in extractive reserves. The article also seeks to make a contribution to debates around the relationship between extractivism, forest conservation, social and economic development, agriculture and cattle raising.

This study was funded by the University of Kent under the MSc. Conservation and Rural Development program and the authors also obtained logistical support from the Chico Mendes Institute of Biodiversity Conservation and financial support from University of Georgia’s Department of Anthropology. Read the full article here!

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