ANTH 4730L/6730L

Human Osteology
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Credit Hours:
4

Human osteology is the study of our bones. Osteology is relevant to disciplines that depend on detailed knowledge of the human body, e.g., forensic anthropology and paleoanthropology. Students will learn to identify and describe bones and use a comparative approach to understand their function and evolution.

Semester Offered:
Fall
Course Type:
Level:

ANTH 4560

Anthropology and Development
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Students are introduced to the major concepts, methods, and issues in international development. The course focuses on pervasive rural and urban poverty, the disparity in wealth both between developing and developed countries and within individual countries, the increasing fragility of the world's natural resource base, the impact of globalization on local communities, changing demographics due to migration and disease, and the effects of national and international policy decisions.

Prerequisites:
ANTH 1102
Semester Offered:
Fall
Level:

ANTH 3310

Cultures of Southeast Asia
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Credit Hours:
3

Introduction to the cultures of Southeast Asia. The topical area covers a vast geographical expanse, a large number of countries, cultures, ethnic groups, languages, religions, and an enormous body of anthropological literature. This course will focus on a select few cross-culturally relevant issues, like ecology, conservation, gender, tourism, human rights, and indigenous peoples, to allow for a broad-based anthropological understanding of the region.

Semester Offered:
Fall
Level:

ANTH 3050

Ethnographic Research Methods
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Building Skills and Competencies in Cultural Anthropology

Have you enjoyed learning about cultural anthropology but have no idea how your degree can be applied? Are you a dual major, and wondering how to apply cultural anthropology to the fields of health, international development, conservation or social change? Are you wondering how to make anthropology practical, and interested in acquiring the basic skills and competencies for doing so? Are you interested in learning about the unique value of qualitative research methods, and how they can be used to solve problems or deepen understanding?

In this class, you will take an ethnographic research project on a topic of interest from start to finish, and learn through hands-on experience how to do this in practice:

1. Individual and group interview techniques
2. Participant observation
3. Data analysis and interpretation
4. How to position yourselves as an anthropologist within different careers

Semester Offered:
Fall
Level:

Suzanne Pilaar Birch Interviewed in Nature Magazine

pilaar birch with skulls

Faculty member Suzanne Pilaar Birch is interviewed about her experience of doing fieldwork while pregnant in this issue of Nature magazine. She shares the factors that went into her making that decision and relates the support she received. Along the way she initiated similar stories from women anthropologists on the website she runs as part of a team: trowelblazers.com.

Read the Nature article here.

GEOARCHAEOLOGY LABORATORY

The Geoarchaeology Laboratory is located in Barrow Hall 14. It is primarily a sedimentological and and pedological laboratory with analytical facilities to include particle-size determination and petrologic analysis using an Olympus stereo-microscope for hand samples and thin sections. More detailed petrographic microscopic analysis is done using an Olympus B20 research microscope located in GG307. The Laboratory has access to elemental and mineralogic analytical instrumentation such as a JEOL  electron microprobe capable of EDS and WDS located in the GG Building.

Suzanne Pilaar Birch and an international research team awarded significant funding for an ancient Near East project

Suzanne Pilaar Birch stands in front of a shelf holding animal skulls

An international research team that includes assistant professor of anthropology and geography Suzanne Pilaar Birch has been awarded Arts and Humanities Research Council UK funding for their four-year project on Radical Death and Early State Formation in the Ancient Near East

Read more about the project in a Franklin Chronicles post here.