Michael Lonneman

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First Name:
Michael
Last Name:
Lonneman

My dissertation research models agricultural land use decision-making and investigates how farmers manage soil resources for both short-term production requirements and long-term productivity. I explore how these decisions influence both long-term changes in agricultural livelihoods and the patterns and process of disturbances in soils, including soil movement and the loss of fertility.

Linda Kosen

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First Name:
Linda
Last Name:
Kosen

In an era characterized by rapid anthropogenic change (the Anthropocene), multispecies ethnographers are increasingly asking how extinction shapes human-animal relationships. My research seeks to explore familiar themes in the extinction literature—like loss, death, and shrinking species ranges—and broaden them in order to ask how rather than always representing closure and finality, extinction may also represent openings and beginnings to new webs of relations between humans and animals.

Travis Jones

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First Name:
Travis
Last Name:
Jones

Travis is a PhD student trained in anthropological archaeology and archaeological science. Travis’ theoretical interests include applications of time in archaeology, organizational complexity, landscapes, and identity. His methodological expertise is in chronological modeling, materials analysis (isotopic and elemental), and the application of large datasets. His dissertation research investigates the timing and tempo of settlement formation and intergroup competition among the earliest villagers in the Middle Missouri region of the Northern Plains.

Sammantha Holder

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First Name:
Sammantha
Last Name:
Holder

My research utilizes stable isotope analysis of human skeletal remains to reconstruct diet and dietary stress in past populations. My current research focuses on how Napoleon Bonaparte's structurally violent military strategies and policies were embodied in the skeletal biology of his soldiers.