Multiscalar Archaeologies Lab

Researchers and faculty in the Multiscalar Archaeologies (MAIES) lab are united by a common desire to understand how the lived experiences of individuals and communities articulate with broad-scale trends in human history. Accomplishing this aim requires the adoption of an explicitly multi-scalar approach to archaeological research. We employ a range of archaeological methodologies, including Bayesian chronological modelling of radiocarbon dates, elemental characterization, social network analysis, and settlement pattern studies.

The Classic Journal Issue 3.1: Bioarchaeology Special Issue

Bioarchaeology

Congratulations to  Dr. Laurie Reitsema's Spring 2018 Bioarchaeology class on having their essays published in The Classic Journal Issue 3.1: Bioarchaeology Special Issue!

The Classic Journal is a cross-disciplinary publication, fostering a community of diverse writers throughout the arts, humanities, and sciences. This journal aims to provide undergraduates with the chance to experience the publishing process.

UGA STEMzone 2018

What do Napoleon’s soldiers, corn, fish conservation, foraging strategies, and human diseases have in common? Visit the ICON and Anthropology’s Human-Nature Booth at the STEM-zone event on game day (Nov. 10) to find out!

ANTH 8040

People and Their Crops, Crops and Their People
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Credit Hours:
1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit.

How do we shape potatoes---or rice, corn, wheat, and other crops---and how do they shape us? How do memory and affect enter into the calculus of breeding and conservation? Two conversations---one on crops as plant genetic resources and the other on crops as resourcing and emerging  in global spaces (aka “wrecks” and “ruins”) —need to be brought together. In this seminar, we will examine human-plant relationships in terms of co-domestication and co-selection. We will be discussing crop diversity from the point of view of science, symbol, sensual engagement, and multispecies becoming and returning.

Prerequisites:
Permission of Major
Semester Offered:
Spring
Level:

ANTH 6085

The Anthropology of Conservation
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Credit Hours:
3

The major human issues related to contemporary conservation initiatives. As these initiatives expand and proliferate, their impact is felt more widely and acutely by local communities, and anthropologists have more opportunities to engage in the process. Examination of various conservation approaches, their impacts on communities, and the ways in which anthropologists have and can contribute to the process.

Prerequisites:
Junior or senior standing or permission of department
Semester Offered:
Spring
Level: