PhD Student
Master of Arts

Contact Info

Office:
Baldwin 268
Of note:

2018 Grants & Fellowships:

Foreign Language and Area Studies Academic Year Fellowship in Quechua, Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute, University of Georgia. 

Foreign Language and Area Studies Summer Fellowship in Quechua, Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute, University of Georgia. 

LACSI Graduate Summer Field Research Award, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School, University of Georgia.

Special Projects Grant, Willson Center for Humanities & Arts, University of Georgia. 

 

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Peer-Reviewed Publications:

Lightsey, Louisiana. 2017. “Prefigurative Politics.” Global South Studies: A Collective Publication with The Global South. https://globalsouthstudies.as.virginia.edu/

Lightsey, Louisiana. 2017. “Biopolitics and Globalization.” Global South Studies: A Collective Publication with The Global South. https://globalsouthstudies.as.virginia.edu/

 

Education:

M.A. Hispanic Literatures and Cultures, University of Arizona. 2016.

B.A. Spanish, Portland State University. 2013.

B.A. Interdisciplinary Arts & Letters, Prescott College. 2005.

 

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Research Areas:
Research Interests:

Political ecology, indigenous mobilization, multispecies ethnography, Amazonian studies, Latin American social movements, political ontology, animal studies, alterpolitics, posthumanist philosophy, visual ethnography and arts-integrated research.

 

Current project:

Entoontologies: Human–Insect Engagement in the Ecuadorian Amazon

Attending to the multifarious insect worlds around us, Hugh Raffles (2010) notes how “too often, we pass through them unknowing, seeing but blind, hearing but deaf, touching but not feeling” (12). But does this observation apply in a place where a single hectare of forest is projected to contain 100,000 insect species, where entomophagy is part of traditional cuisine, and where bugs play key roles, both cosmological and ecological, in multisensory social practices? Enlisting the help of local entomological knowledge from both indigenous and scientific perspectives, I seek to explore the overlapping, and oftentimes contradictory, ontological aspects of the insect in lowland tropical Ecuador: as nonhuman person, dangerous predator, foraged food, exotic commodity, or biodiversity superstar. This project invites multispecies ethnography—attentive to the lives of animals, plants, peoples, and things (Ogden et al. 2013)—to consider some of the smallest and most resilient creatures on the planet. By incorporating video ethnography and digital storytelling I hope to stimulate public reevaluation of how insects are, and might be, perceived and engaged by the people who share their worlds, in order to both enlarge the scope and sharpen the gaze of an “anthropology beyond the human” (Kohn 2013).

Sponsored by a Special Projects Grant, Willson Center for Humanities & Arts, University of Georgia, in conjunction with the Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities National Conference, 2018.