Distinguished Research Professor
Founding Director, Center for Integrative Conservation Research

Contact Info

Office:
264B Baldwin Hall
Phone Number:
Personal Website:

Rainforest Politics in Sarawak, East Malaysia: My research focused on transnational environmental politics in Sarawak, East Malaysia.

Conservation and the Politics of Knowledge: I’ve developed a rigorous, coherent ethnographic research program linking anthropology and conservation. In this research I’ve argued that the social context in which conservation is carried out encompasses much more than the social realities that exist at specific sites of intervention. Developing new understandings of conservation requires that we focus our research efforts not only on particular sites of implementation, but also on sites of organization, concept-development and planning. I’ve devoted particular attention to the emergence of community-based conservation.

Center for Integrative Conservation Research: Responds, through research and training, to a key challenge facing conservation today: identifying conservation practices and policies that simultaneously preserve biodiversity and serve human needs

Education:

PhD, Anthropology, University of Michigan, 1992

Research Interests:
  • Integrative conservation research
  • Political Ecology
  • Environmental Anthropology
  • Politics of translation
  • Transnational environmental movements and institutions
  • Peninsular Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Indonesia)
Selected Publications:

2017.  Tara Ruttenberg and J. Peter Brosius.  “Decolonizing Sustainable Surf Tourism.”  In The Critical Surf Studies Reader, edited by Dexter Zavalza Hough-Snee & Alexander Eastman.  Duke University Press.

2017. Hitchner, Sarah, John Schelhas, and J. Peter Brosius. “‘Even Our Dairy Queen Shut Down’: Risk and Resilience in Bioenergy Development in Forest-dependent Communities in the U.S. South.” Economic Anthropology 4(2): 186-199.

2016.  Hitchner, Sarah, John Schelhas, and J. Peter Brosius. “Snake Oil, Silver Buckshot, and People Who Hate Us: Metaphors and Conventional Discourses of Wood-Based Bioenergy in the Rural Southeastern U.S.” Human Organization 75(3): 204-217.