Exploration of the scientific principles governing natural systems and their contribution to understanding the emergence and biological evolution of humans, the role of environment in shaping human behavioral and cultural variation, and the consequences of human activity on local, regional, and…

An introduction to forensic anthropology, focusing on human identification through analysis of bone and teeth. Students learn the basic information used by forensic anthropologists to recognize and evaluate sex, age, stature, genetic origin, disease, and trauma. Human skeletal anatomy, forensic…

Exploration of the complete story of human evolution, from our origins in Africa, our affinities with all primates, and our modern biological and cultural adaptations.

Variation in human culture and biology from the earliest beginnings to the present, including relationships between human biology, culture, and the environment, and an understanding of contemporary cultural differences.

Examination of the efforts of anthropologists to understand the contemporary world by providing a broad overview of approaches to the study of cultures of consumption.

The origins, causes, and consequences of warfare in human societies from the Paleolithic to the twenty-first century. Ethnographic, ethnohistoric, and archaeological data will be employed to evaluate the relationship between conflict and cultural change.

In this course “roots” and “rooting” are summoned as metaphors for re-territorialization and cultural revitalization among indigenous peoples, refugees, and immigrants whose senses of place may be undermined in a globalizing world. This course explores the scholarship on sensory memory and…

Topical and theoretical overview of cultural anthropology and ethnography, including explaining culture and cultural diversity; cultural categories such as race, ethnicity, and gender; social institutions such as marriage, family, religion, and law; and food production and exchange. Critical…

Examination of ethnic and cultural diversity, and issues of gender, race, class, and culture within Mexican society. Consideration will also be given to the historical, political, economic, and social experiences of Mexican ethnic and cultural groups with special attention to their diversity and…

The development and use of theory in archaeology. The roots of theory in archaeology and how it impacts archaeological methods, an understanding of some of the major theoretical paradigms currently influencing archaeological research, and how to translate abstract ideas into research questions…

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains in archaeological contexts. The skeleton is a dynamic structure that responds to stressors in the natural and built environments, offering insights on health, human-environment interactions, and social processes in the past. This course covers basics…

Archaeological geology examines the use of earth science methods and theories in the study of archaeological sites and their contents. The four major areas covered include: (1) the archaeological site and geology; (2) age determination techniques; (3) exploration techniques; (4) artifact…

The major human issues related to contemporary conservation initiatives. As these initiatives expand and proliferate, their impact is felt more widely and acutely by local communities, and anthropologists have more opportunities to engage in the process. Examination of various conservation…

How do we shape potatoes---or rice, corn, wheat, and other crops---and how do they shape us? How do memory and affect enter into the calculus of breeding and conservation? Two conversations---one on crops as plant genetic resources and the other on crops as…