Exploration of the scientific principles governing natural systems and their contribution to understanding the emergence and biological evolution of humans, the role of environment in shaping human behavioral and cultural variation, and the consequences of human activity on local, regional, and…

Exploration of the scientific principles governing natural systems and their contribution to understanding the emergence and biological evolution of humans, the role of environment in shaping human behavioral and cultural variation, and the consequences of human activity on local, regional, and…

Students are introduced to the most famous archaeological sites in the world, with themes centered around the following: evidence of early humans, first cities, death and burial, art and architecture, ritual and religion, warfare, sacrifice and conflict, and great inventions.

The theory of evolution by natural selection through the natural history of humankind and of our closest relatives, the primates. Concepts of macro and microevolution, adaptation, cell and genetics, paleontology, human and primate origins, brain and language evolution, bioarchaeology, and…

The theory of evolution by natural selection through the natural history of humankind and of our closest relatives, the primates. Concepts of macro and microevolution, adaptation, cell and genetics, paleontology, human and primate origins, brain and language evolution, bioarchaeology, and…

Provides students from any major the basic foundations for conducting ethnographic fieldwork. Students will explore the unique strengths and utility of an ethnographic approach; learn how to conduct ethnographic techniques through hands-on, experiential learning activities; and apply these…

Contemporary assessment of the multiple ways in which societies understand, value, regulate, and engage with water. Provides an international perspective on the relationship between water and culture, with a focus towards global sustainability.

Basic concepts and principles of archaeology. Topics covered include history of archaeology, site formation processes, survey and excavation techniques, artifact typology and analysis, chronology, activity analysis, and general archaeological theory.

Relationships between humans and material things, with a strong emphasis on the material culture of Georgia from 10,000 BC until about AD 1900.

Exploration and examination of the archaeological evidence for mankind's prehistoric experience in Central and Western Europe and the development of Celtic culture based on the archaeological support for these ideas. Paleoecological, climatological, and geo-biological models will also be used to…

Introduction to the cultures of South Asia. The topical area covers a vast geographical expanse, a large number of countries, cultures, ethnic groups, languages, religions, and an enormous body of anthropological literature. This course will focus on a select few cross-culturally relevant issues…

Cultural diversity of contemporary Native American tribes of the continental United States and Alaska, including lifestyles, politics, literature, music, art, and socioeconomic conditions.

Through readings, discussions, and research projects this course will try to confront what D.W. Meinig's "central problem," "Any landscape is comprised not only of what lies before our eyes but what lies inside our heads."

Provides a broad overview of the history of cultural anthropology, from its beginnings in the Enlightenment to the present. We combine two approaches in this course: (1) an intellectual history approach, and (2) an approach that examines particular ethnographic accounts as exemplars of various…

Explores contemporary and past hunter-gatherer societies. The course examines cultural anthropologists' attempts to understand the similarities and differences between the lives of foragers and ourselves, ecological anthropologists' attempts to explain diversity of foraging behaviors, and…

Human osteology is the study of our bones. Osteology is relevant to disciplines that depend on detailed knowledge of the human body, e.g., forensic anthropology and paleoanthropology. Students will learn to identify and describe bones and use a comparative approach to understand their function…

Introduction of the theoretical framework of Conservation Biology using primates as examples, including genetic variation, population demographics, life history strategies, interspecific interactions, and conservation strategies and tactics.

Exploration of digital/internet issues related to archaeology, geography, and the digital humanities, e.g., who owns the past, and how do we disseminate (or withhold) information about our shared national and global heritage?

Examination of the scientific principles of human adaptation through intersection impacts of physical, social, and cultural stressors on human variation.

This course will examine human death and dying from a cross-cultural perspective. It will draw on ethnographic readings and films to examine the archaeological record for burials and the varying cultural attitudes towards death. It will survey funerary traditions and mortuary rituals for the…